'Consonance'


Marco Reichert


+


Per Ahlmann


Paintings & Ceramics.
20.01 - 18.02

Marco Reichert



To draw the connection between each single work of Reichert, he comes to the conclusion that his intention is to relate geometric abstraction, the depiction of the process and its materiality.The process and its visible marks are the foundation of the final work and therefore the used material becomes elementary to the concept.

Different treatment of the surface and multilayering lead to new structures, surface conditions and colors, which couldn't be reached without going through these painterly mechanisms.During its development Reichert glues the raw canvas quite often on the floor to catch traces of prior paintings and to relate every single work to a much wider comprehensive ongoing process.

Besides the actual paintings the most essential point of creating his works are the three-dimensional objects he builds, which are most of the time not intentionally meant to be sculptures, they are tools within the painting process.The paintings and the three-dimensional structures are intrinsically tied to each other.

The works refer to shapes, outlines and signs he has seen before but they are always in response to the surface and previous layers. This stylistic language is drawn from the 20th century's architecture, aspects of popular culture, programming, design and art. But there is no imitation or direct reference. It is a much more complex and subtle relationship, which is very often not retraceable.

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Per Ahlmann



In Per Ahlmann's ongoing project – the ceramic sculpture – he investigates how three-dimensional objects in our immediate surroundings, more or less intentionally, are present and relates to their environment. As he states:

'The spectrum of the field of sculpture is enormous. If I would try to categorize my position, it would be one of working with sculpture that is about sculpture. I consider a sculpture to be successful if it is self-reliant. When it appears as a representation of something you ought to recognize, while being completely abstract. For a sculpture to evoke this sentiment it must contain credibility and possess a natural obviousness in the juxtapositions of the single sculptural elements and the transitions between these parts'.

On his working with the clay itself, Per Ahlmann says: 'Technically, I have great pleasure in 'tightening up' a form. It's fantastic to build up a volume of clay quite carelessly and then, in the leather-hard state, to smooth it out with tools, water, sponge, etc, until the surface becomes delicate to the touch. But the opposite of this is attractive too: the traces of a quick elaboration. It may actually be this very characteristic of clay, that I value the most – the way in which 'time' so easily is transmitted to and manifests itself in this compliant material'.

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IMAGES FROM THE EXHIBITION



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